Peaceful Freedom Democratic challenges 25 years after the fall of the wall

Emphatically  

celebrating  

the  

25  

years  

anniversary

of  

the  

fall  

of  

the  

Berlin  

Wall  

makes  

sense:  

This

event  

has  

been  

a  

breakthrough  

for  

freedom  

and

democracy in Europe.

Indeed   

there   

are   

big   

challenges:   

The   

current

democracies  

in  

Europe  

exhibit  

massive  

deficits  

-

see  

the  

overly  

strong  

power  

of  

some  

lobbies,  

such

as   

the   

financial   

lobby,   

the   

pharma   

lobby,   

the

warfare  

lobby,  

the  

car  

producers  

and  

the  

nutrient

producers.   

See   

limited   

human   

rights   

of   

some

groups,  

such  

as  

persons  

relegated  

to  

psychiatry

(particularly  

in  

some  

substates,  

such  

as  

Bavaria)

or    

the    

Sinti    

and    

Roma    

in    

some    

European

countries.  

See  

also  

low  

or  

missing  

opportunities  

of

direct   

participation   

in   

some   

states,   

particularly

Germany.  

Finally  

public  

needs,  

such  

as  

minimal

economic  

standards,  

are  

not  

practically  

met  

in  

all

European  

countries  

-  

see  

for  

instance  

percentages

of   

joblessness   

up   

to   

50%   

in   

some   

population

groups in Spain and Greece.  

Another    

current    

challenge    

of    

the    

European

democracies  

regards  

an  

effective  

peace  

process

in  

Middle  

East  

and  

other  

parts  

of  

the  

world:  

We  

are

experincing  

a  

dramatic  

loss  

of  

freedoms  

in  

some

regions,  

such  

as  

the  

Eastern  

Ukraine,  

Syria,  

and

Northern   

Iraq.   

Referring   

to   

the   

responsibility   

of

other  

actors,  

such  

as  

Putin,  

Assad,  

or  

the  

Iraqi

government,  

is  

not  

enough.  

Certainly,  

those  

actors

have   

massively   

contributed   

to   

some   

precarious

processes   

in   

the   

last   

years;   

but   

Europe   

as   

a

strong  

democratic  

continent  

has  

to  

consequently

work   

for   

the   

rule   

of   

international   

law.   

In   

an

increasingly  

connected  

world  

of  

almost  

8  

billion

people,   

the   

ongoing   

acceptance   

of   

-   

anyway

l

egitimated  

-  

hate  

and  

violence  

implies  

existential

risks   

for   

the   

mankind.   

Facing   

these   

risks,   

the

democratic  

Europe  

should  

develop  

a  

strategy  

of

effective      

peace      

policy      

-      

comprising      

the

consequential  

condemnation

  

and  

marginalization

Aktuelles

of  

hate  

and  

violence,  

the  

political  

and  

military  

strenghtening  

of

the  

United  

Nations,  

and  

an  

international  

policy  

of  

sustainable

political  

solutions  

(different  

from  

the  

short-sighted  

political  

and

military jobhopping of the USA).

Indeed,   

a   

system   

that   

tries   

to   

control   

immigration   

(EU)

fundamentally  

differs  

from  

a  

system  

that  

prohibits  

free  

mobility

of  

its  

inhabitants  

(GDR).  

Nevertheless,  

the  

allegation  

Berlin

wall  

crosses  

had  

been  

stolen  

to  

protest  

EU  

border  

deaths  

may

stimulate  

the  

discussion  

about  

how  

to  

manage  

immigration

best.

 

 

 
IPA Institute for Political Analysis Prof. Dr. Volker von Prittwitz